Posts Tagged ‘west’

In 1492, columbus sailed the ocean blue

In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

If you are like me, you learned that rhyme sometime in elementary school.

Specifically, Columbus left on his first voyage on August 3, 1492, sailing in search of a seagoing route from Europe to Asia with the vision of creating a trade route for spices, silk and more.

He led a crew of three ships on that voyage and, as history shows, instead found islands of North America. While not the first European to make this discovery (the Norse did it 500 years prior), it was his voyages that lead to the widespread awareness (and eventual colonization) of “the New World”.

Enough history.

I am writing about Columbus not because of his discoveries, or even his major mistakes, but because of what his life can teach every leader.

Here are five specific lessons, as valuable today as ever, that we all can take from Columbus` legendary life.

Exercise your belief. Columbus believed the earth was smaller in circumference than most did. This belief led him to the logical (based on his beliefs) assertion that within a few weeks his ships could reach Asia. While he was wrong, he built his plan based on that belief, gathered support for his plan in spite of ridicule and disbelief, and crafted a plan to test those beliefs. This is what leaders do.

When did you last exercise your beliefs in a tangible way?

Find great supporters. Columbus didn`t have the resources, power or money to put his plan into action. He tried to build support in Portugal and England, before finally persuading Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain to support his plan. Even Royalty wasn`t enough – his supporters also included a group of Italian business interests. Great leaders know they can`t do it alone, and they are persistent in building support for their visions and beliefs.

Have you created a team of supporters for your vision?

Don`t be satisfied. Columbus found land in his first voyage (what is now the Bahamas), but he didn`t find the trade route he sought. So he went again, and again and again. Ultimately he led four voyages; each finding new territory (and getting as far as Panama). While you could classify him a failure in achieving his desired goal, you can`t call him a quitter. When your vision is clear, and your belief strong, you can lead persistently.

How persistent are you? Do you lead past the first challenge or failure?

Build a plan. Columbus didn`t just go to Queen Isabella, turn on the charm, lay out some ideas and then go hop on the ship. His navigational beliefs, his travel plans, and his funding support came together over several years. The funding process alone started seven years before he sailed. Over that time he honed his plan, made adjustments, and continued to build as he brought the plan to ultimate fruition.

Do you plan? Are you willing to adjust and modify when necessary in service of your beliefs and vision?

Think bigger. In the time of Columbus you could get spices from Asia on the overland route. Before he sailed, people had even gotten there by sea by sailing around the tip of Africa. Columbus, though, thought bigger. He believed from his study and planning that he could make it directly, more quickly and more cost effectively by sailing west. He didn`t tie himself to conventional wisdom or approaches. He thought bigger. It was this bigger thinking that ultimately helped him sell his plan.

How big do you think? Are your visions large enough to captivate, persuade and engage others to follow you?

The story of Columbus proves that we can learn from events and actions from more than 500 years ago and while the context has changed, the lessons are as real and valuable as ever. The lessons are always there, when we look for them.

The other major message of this article isn`t just the lessons, but is found in the questions after each idea; questions that beg application of the lessons. Learn the lessons, but answer the questions to really bring the lessons to life for you and those you lead.

Remarkable Leaders are continually learning and practicing the lessons of Columbus, which is just one example of why learning continually is one of the competencies of The Remarkable Leadership Learning System – a one skill at a time, one month at a time approach to becoming a more confident and successful leader. You can get two months of that unique system for free as part of our Most Remarkable Free Leadership Gift Ever today at http://MostRemarkableFreeLeadershipGiftEver.com and become the leader you were born to be.

Business leaders: secrets of personality profiling

Business Leaders: Secrets of Personality Profiling!

Have you ever had a discussion with a client, employee or vendor that just didn’t click? Would you like to know how to communicate with people in business and in your personal life, regardless of how different their personality is?

A few years ago, I was introduced to the subject of personality profiling. By understanding the four different personality types, you can significantly increase understanding of board members, employees, and even your family. You will
experience amazing results. The personality profiling system is called DISC testing.

The letters DISC stand for the four prominent personality types. All people fit into this scheme in one way or another, and are usually a combination of a least two of these types. These types are as follows:

High D stands for dominating.
High I stands for influencer.
High S stands for steadiness.
High C stands for compliance.

Let’s first take a look at how to use DISC testing to develop a team, and then study how to use this system to communicate more effectively with prospects and clients to really enhance your abilities in any endeavor.

Most property managers and some company or board presidents will find that they fit into the High D category. If you are a High D, you’ll be the driving force in your company. You are the leader. You are the quarterback of the team. You are innovative and organized. You want quick results. You want everything abbreviated, because you have the ability to quickly assess a situation and make a rapid decision.

Although all these are outstanding qualities, you, (High D’s) have to remember that Rome wasn’t built in a day. Just because something has been discussed, it doesn’t mean that the task is immediately accomplished by waving a magic wand. You need to learn to be more patient and to listen more often. Most importantly, you need to realize that the rest of the people in your world are trying frantically to keep up the rapid pace you have set for yourself.

If you are just a bit friendlier, and make an effort to compliment your staff on a job well done, it will go a long way in gaining their trust. They will then feel more comfortable in approaching you with new ideas, or with problems they may have

Let’s take a look at high I. The high I personality, or the influencer, is a very social person. I find that many great sales people fall into this category. They are the master net-workers. They are charming and upbeat, with loads of team spirit, and are instinctively great communicators. This is the type of person who is motivated by popularity and acceptance.

Give the high I on your team lots of interaction with clients and prospects in order to fulfill their social needs. They need to be able to interact and socialize—this is very important to them.
The High I typically lacks organizational skills, and will need help from the high D on your team in this area. They will also motivate others towards the common goal.

They are the cheerleaders on the team. They are the people who work the room at a cocktail party, and often walk out with fifteen to twenty business cards. These are the people who are at various events at CAI, MHA, Twin West, etc.

Let’s examine the high S. The high S person is noted for loyalty. These are the team players. These are the people who have an amazing ability to add a personal touch that sets the team apart from their competition.

As long as the High S has a clear understanding of the business model, they will carry it out with extreme devotion, because they crave a stable environment to work in.
They are characterized by their ability to maintain deeply loyal relationships, because they are motivated by safety, security, and recognition of that loyalty

However, if the high S has a disagreement with others on the team, watch out! They will be inclined to hold it inside, since they don’t like conflict or sudden change.

To complete our tour of the four personality types, let’s look at the high C. High C personalities are the analytical problem solvers of the world. They border on being compulsively meticulous. I’m sure you have most likely had clients along these lines.

High C’s have the ability to offer creative solutions to complex problems, because they deal well with facts and calculations. This is your classic engineer. At the same time, they are inclined to focus so much on the hard data that they omit the human factor. They can over think the situation, and quite literally make a mountain out of a molehill. When you need a solution that requires close attention to detail, the high C will strive for perfection, and will set an excellent example for the team to follow.

You may find that their attention to detail slows things down too much. This is especially true if you are a high D. The high C likes to work at a snail’s pace, while the high D is running 100 miles per hour. C’s are the folks you dread in the homeowner association; because they are nit-picking every single detail and they cause you lots of headaches.

By testing yourself and your team members, you can gain insight into why certain people click, and how to approach each other with the most favorable outcome in mind.

I have provided you with a cursory DISC test. This test will enable you to assess someone in an initial conversation. This is not a supplement to a DISC test—the full test is in excess of 100 questions. However, there is a way to be relatively sure of someone’s personality profile by just asking yourself a couple of questions:

Question #1: Is this person more assertive, or more reserved?

Question #2: Is the person more logical, or more emotional? This question may take a few more seconds of conversation for you to answer, since it is a bit more difficult to determine the answer.

Let’s imagine that a new prospect named “Tom” calls to talk with you about the possibility of hiring your property management company. During the conversation, you ask yourself the first question about Tom, “Is he assertive or reserved?”

You notice that he asks lots of questions, and is very forthcoming with information about what his wants, needs, and concerns are. You don’t have to draw information out of him because he is telling you what he wants. You notice that he’s taken control of the situation, and you are having a tough time getting a word in. This means he is assertive.

Since a D and an I are assertive, you’ve determined that Tom is either a high D or a high I, and you are now working within the top half of the quadrant only. An S or a C would be much more reserved.

You then ask yourself, “Is Tom more emotional or more logical?”

He often uses the phrase, “I think.” (instead of “I feel”) He takes time to evaluate his options and to crunch numbers. This leads you to believe that Tom is a logical thinker. The two logical thinkers are high D and high C. However, since you’ve already eliminated high C by asking the first question, we’ve identified Tom as a high D.

Once you’ve established a prospect’s personality type, you have a better understanding of how they process information. This understanding is key to communications.
Let’s continue with Tom. You’ve figured out that he is a high D. You can know put to use your knowledge of the high D personality type. You know they don’t want to take too much time out of their busy day to speak with you. They want things to happen quickly, and they are fast decision-makers. You need to be brief, to the point, and as efficient as possible.

On the contrary, if you have a high I, things are different. On the grid, we have an assertive person who is emotional. With a high I, you want to take some time to ask about their personal interests. You want to ask what they did last weekend, and about their family. Get social, because they relate to that. When you have future appointments with them, be sure to schedule extra time to accommodate their need to chitchat for an extra ten minutes. These touches aren’t to manipulate a person, but to honor them by communicating in their preferred fashion, even if they aren’t aware of what that is.

Let’s say you’ve determined that this person is a high S. Now we are looking at the bottom-right corner of the grid, which represents reserved and emotional. You need to win the trust of a high S. They are loyal team players. If you can make them feel a part of the team, they will champion your cause to the degree that they will be an additional sales rep out in the field.

Don’t be too aggressive when you speak with a high S, because they need to absorb information at their own pace. You must provide them with solutions that speak to their needs of security and stability. They are very family-oriented.

The final personality type you might run into is the high C. Quite frankly. C’s can be the most difficult people to work with. (Except my wife, who is perfect in every way.) They are very logical and very reserved. They are going to be low-key, and have a long thought process. A high C doesn’t want to listen to a fast-talking person. Deliver information at a slow pace, and deliver facts only. They don’t operate on emotion. These people do very well with spreadsheets.

When receiving a referral from someone familiar with DISC, I might hear: “This person is a high C.” I immediately know that this person will need time to determine whether to work with me, and that they will want to see the numbers in detail. They will also ask lots of specific and detailed questions that I’ll need to be prepared to answer.

In conclusion, working with members of your extended team in utilizing this process is very helpful. The best part about this is that the client wins. They are being treated in the way that works best for them.

Publisher’s Directions: This article may be freely distributed so long as the copyright, author’s information, disclaimer, and an active link (where possible) are included. Disclaimer: Statements and opinions expressed in the articles, reviews and other materials herein are those of the authors. While every care has been taken in the compilation of this information and every attempt made to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Steve Hoogenakker will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within these pages or any information accessed through this site. Steve loves his wife Teri Hoogenakker and their kids, Paul Hoogenakker, Kirsten Hoogenakker and Gerrit Hoogenakker very much.

This article written by Steve Hoogenakker of Taylor Made Landscape. Steve has 20 years in leadership and management. He can be reached at Steve@Landscape.Pro.

In his book cowboy ethics: what wall street can learn from the code of the west, james owen writes that ” real courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway

In his book Cowboy Ethics: What Wall Street Can Learn from the Code of the West, James Owen writes that ” real courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway.” I know how true that statement is because I have been struggling with that particular fear for the best part of this past year.

In addition to our eighteen school horses we also own two young horses, Bob and Swish. While both have been professionally trained they are still very “green” and inexperienced as well as being large and athletic. Bob is a confident horse who is always trying to take charge, while Swish lacks self-confidence and tends to bolt and spook frequently.

I did not realize to what extent my other more experienced horses filled in for my leadership flaws until I started riding the babies. Certainly it is important that you have the physical skill to keep your butt balanced in the saddle and that you deliver the correct signals to your horse. But what really matters to the horse is your ability to be a confident leader. In the riding world we call this quality ‘clear intent’ and it is a definite, confident statement of intention transmitted through your body language to your horse.

I have worked with and ridden my older horses for a long time. They trust me and they know they can depend on me most of the time. If I slip up or lose focus they are forgiving enough to fill in for me. What I didn’t realize however was that this comfortable relationship was not a true test of my leadership abilities My leadership gaps became quickly and obviously apparent on the back of a quivering 1200 pound baby horse. After a particularly nerve-wracking ride on Bob last fall I quit riding for six months. I came up with every excuse why I couldn’t or shouldn’t get on the babies.. I occasionally rode one of my other horses so that I could tell myself I was still a competent rider but I knew that I was avoiding an important issue.

I came to the realization that what I feared was not the horse’s potential actions and behaviours but my own inability to take a leadership role when I was taken out of my comfort zone. I had the physical skills to stay in the saddle but I lacked the commitment and clear intent to convince my horse that listening to me was his best option, especially during a crisis.

I doubt that there is a corporate leader or business owner who hasn’t struggled at one time with self-doubt and fear. Hostile employees, dysfunctional teams, difficult clients, rigid and impossible deadlines and financial crises force leaders to step outside their comfort zones on a daily basis. It is exhausting and stressful and requires courage, commitment and belief in ones-self.

My experience this past year with Swish and Bob has been a powerful real- life learning experience for me. I decided that unless I wanted to own two very expensive lawn ornaments for the next twenty years I would have to stiffen my spine, sit up straight (literally) and convince all three of us that I had what it took. I began riding them again two months ago. While it is a constant challenge for me to assert my leadership I know that I have to step outside of my comfort zone and challenge myself in order to grow and develop as a leader. I have learned to take it one step at a time and to celebrate each small victory. Every time I stand on the mounting block I still have to take a deep breath before I mount up but I know now that true leadership begins when, despite your fear, you make the commitment to throw your leg over the saddle.

City name specification material steel / origin price change notes shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 northern taiwan 3510 – – shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 west side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 12 hrb400 west side 3600 – – shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 ping steel 3520 – – shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 jiuquan steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 jinan iron and steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 cheng gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 yong gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 28 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3770 – – shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 12 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3720 – – shanghai grade rebar 16 hrb400 baosteel 3630 – – shanghai grade rebar 12 hrb400 baosteel 3810 – – shanghai grade rebar 10 hrb400 baosteel 3890 – out of stock shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 northern taiwan 3510 – – shanghai grade rebar 14 hrb400 west side 3600 – – shanghai grade rebar 32 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3770 – – shanghai grade rebar 14 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3720 – – shanghai grade rebar 14 hrb400 baosteel 3810 – – shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 west side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 ping steel 3520 – – shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 jiuquan steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 jinan iron and steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 cheng gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 yong gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 18 hrb400 baosteel 3630 – – shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 west side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 ping steel 3520 – – shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 jiuquan steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 jinan iron and steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 cheng gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 yong gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 20 hrb400 baosteel 3630 – – shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 ping steel 3520 – – shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 cheng gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 west side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 jiuquan steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 jinan iron and steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 yong gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 22 hrb400 baosteel 3630 – – shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 west side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 jiuquan steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 jinan iron and steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 yong gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 maanshan iron & steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 shanghai grade rebar 25 hrb400 baosteel 3630 – – shanghai high line 8 q235 hai xin 3450 – – shanghai high line 8 q215 henan renhe 3450 – – shanghai high line 8 q235 northern taiwan 3430 – – shanghai high line 10 q235 ping steel 3440 – – shanghai high line 6

City Name Specification Material Steel / Origin Price Change Notes Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Northern Taiwan 3510 – – Shanghai Grade Rebar 16 HRB400 Sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 West Side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 12 HRB400 West Side 3600 – – Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Ping Steel 3520 – – Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Jiuquan Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Jinan Iron and Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Cheng Gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Yong Gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 28 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3770 – – Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 12 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3720 – – Shanghai grade rebar 16 HRB400 Baosteel 3630 – – Shanghai grade rebar 12 HRB400 Baosteel 3810 – – Shanghai grade rebar 10 HRB400 Baosteel 3890 – Out of stock Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Northern Taiwan 3510 – – Shanghai grade rebar 14 HRB400 West Side 3600 – – Shanghai grade rebar 32 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3770 – – Shanghai grade rebar 14 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3720 – – Shanghai grade rebar 14 HRB400 Baosteel 3810 – – Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 West Side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Ping Steel 3520 – – Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Jiuquan Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Jinan Iron and Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Cheng Gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Yong Gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 18 HRB400 Baosteel 3630 – – Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 West Side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Ping Steel 3520 – – Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Jiuquan Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Jinan Iron and Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Cheng Gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Yong Gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 20 HRB400 Baosteel 3630 – – Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Ping Steel 3520 – – Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Cheng Gang 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 West Side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Jiuquan Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Jinan Iron and Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Yong Gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 22 HRB400 Baosteel 3630 – – Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Sunshine 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 West Side 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Nanchang 3520 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Jiuquan Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Jinan Iron and Steel 3530 – 25mm: 3700 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Yong Gang 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Maanshan Iron & Steel 3590 – 25mm: 3750 Shanghai grade rebar 25 HRB400 Baosteel 3630 – – Shanghai High Line 8 Q235 Hai Xin 3450 – – Shanghai High Line 8 Q215 Henan Renhe 3450 – – Shanghai High Line 8 Q235 Northern Taiwan 3430 – – Shanghai High Line 10 Q235 Ping Steel 3440 – – Shanghai High Line 6.5 Q235 Ping Steel 3440 – – Shanghai High Line 6.5 Q235 Hai Xin 3450 – – Shanghai High Line 6.5 Q215 Henan Renhe 3450 – – Shanghai High Line 6.5 Q235 Northern Taiwan 3430 – – Shanghai High Line 8 Q235 Ping Steel 3440 – – Shanghai Rebar 14 HRB335 West Side 3600 – – Shanghai Rebar 14 HRB335 New Big 3600 – – Shanghai Rebar 25 HRB335 Yinfeng 3,400 – – Shanghai Rebar 14 HRB335 Shanghai Bao 3510 – – Shanghai Rebar 32 HRB335 Angang Xinyang 3630 – – Shanghai Rebar 32 HRB335 Baosteel 3760 – – Shanghai Rebar 14 HRB335 Baosteel 3770 – 14mm: 3670 Shanghai Rebar 10 HRB335 Baosteel 3830 – Out of stock Shanghai Rebar 14 HRB335 Yong Gang 3650 –

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