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Business leaders: secrets of personality profiling

Business Leaders: Secrets of Personality Profiling!

Have you ever had a discussion with a client, employee or vendor that just didn’t click? Would you like to know how to communicate with people in business and in your personal life, regardless of how different their personality is?

A few years ago, I was introduced to the subject of personality profiling. By understanding the four different personality types, you can significantly increase understanding of board members, employees, and even your family. You will
experience amazing results. The personality profiling system is called DISC testing.

The letters DISC stand for the four prominent personality types. All people fit into this scheme in one way or another, and are usually a combination of a least two of these types. These types are as follows:

High D stands for dominating.
High I stands for influencer.
High S stands for steadiness.
High C stands for compliance.

Let’s first take a look at how to use DISC testing to develop a team, and then study how to use this system to communicate more effectively with prospects and clients to really enhance your abilities in any endeavor.

Most property managers and some company or board presidents will find that they fit into the High D category. If you are a High D, you’ll be the driving force in your company. You are the leader. You are the quarterback of the team. You are innovative and organized. You want quick results. You want everything abbreviated, because you have the ability to quickly assess a situation and make a rapid decision.

Although all these are outstanding qualities, you, (High D’s) have to remember that Rome wasn’t built in a day. Just because something has been discussed, it doesn’t mean that the task is immediately accomplished by waving a magic wand. You need to learn to be more patient and to listen more often. Most importantly, you need to realize that the rest of the people in your world are trying frantically to keep up the rapid pace you have set for yourself.

If you are just a bit friendlier, and make an effort to compliment your staff on a job well done, it will go a long way in gaining their trust. They will then feel more comfortable in approaching you with new ideas, or with problems they may have

Let’s take a look at high I. The high I personality, or the influencer, is a very social person. I find that many great sales people fall into this category. They are the master net-workers. They are charming and upbeat, with loads of team spirit, and are instinctively great communicators. This is the type of person who is motivated by popularity and acceptance.

Give the high I on your team lots of interaction with clients and prospects in order to fulfill their social needs. They need to be able to interact and socialize—this is very important to them.
The High I typically lacks organizational skills, and will need help from the high D on your team in this area. They will also motivate others towards the common goal.

They are the cheerleaders on the team. They are the people who work the room at a cocktail party, and often walk out with fifteen to twenty business cards. These are the people who are at various events at CAI, MHA, Twin West, etc.

Let’s examine the high S. The high S person is noted for loyalty. These are the team players. These are the people who have an amazing ability to add a personal touch that sets the team apart from their competition.

As long as the High S has a clear understanding of the business model, they will carry it out with extreme devotion, because they crave a stable environment to work in.
They are characterized by their ability to maintain deeply loyal relationships, because they are motivated by safety, security, and recognition of that loyalty

However, if the high S has a disagreement with others on the team, watch out! They will be inclined to hold it inside, since they don’t like conflict or sudden change.

To complete our tour of the four personality types, let’s look at the high C. High C personalities are the analytical problem solvers of the world. They border on being compulsively meticulous. I’m sure you have most likely had clients along these lines.

High C’s have the ability to offer creative solutions to complex problems, because they deal well with facts and calculations. This is your classic engineer. At the same time, they are inclined to focus so much on the hard data that they omit the human factor. They can over think the situation, and quite literally make a mountain out of a molehill. When you need a solution that requires close attention to detail, the high C will strive for perfection, and will set an excellent example for the team to follow.

You may find that their attention to detail slows things down too much. This is especially true if you are a high D. The high C likes to work at a snail’s pace, while the high D is running 100 miles per hour. C’s are the folks you dread in the homeowner association; because they are nit-picking every single detail and they cause you lots of headaches.

By testing yourself and your team members, you can gain insight into why certain people click, and how to approach each other with the most favorable outcome in mind.

I have provided you with a cursory DISC test. This test will enable you to assess someone in an initial conversation. This is not a supplement to a DISC test—the full test is in excess of 100 questions. However, there is a way to be relatively sure of someone’s personality profile by just asking yourself a couple of questions:

Question #1: Is this person more assertive, or more reserved?

Question #2: Is the person more logical, or more emotional? This question may take a few more seconds of conversation for you to answer, since it is a bit more difficult to determine the answer.

Let’s imagine that a new prospect named “Tom” calls to talk with you about the possibility of hiring your property management company. During the conversation, you ask yourself the first question about Tom, “Is he assertive or reserved?”

You notice that he asks lots of questions, and is very forthcoming with information about what his wants, needs, and concerns are. You don’t have to draw information out of him because he is telling you what he wants. You notice that he’s taken control of the situation, and you are having a tough time getting a word in. This means he is assertive.

Since a D and an I are assertive, you’ve determined that Tom is either a high D or a high I, and you are now working within the top half of the quadrant only. An S or a C would be much more reserved.

You then ask yourself, “Is Tom more emotional or more logical?”

He often uses the phrase, “I think.” (instead of “I feel”) He takes time to evaluate his options and to crunch numbers. This leads you to believe that Tom is a logical thinker. The two logical thinkers are high D and high C. However, since you’ve already eliminated high C by asking the first question, we’ve identified Tom as a high D.

Once you’ve established a prospect’s personality type, you have a better understanding of how they process information. This understanding is key to communications.
Let’s continue with Tom. You’ve figured out that he is a high D. You can know put to use your knowledge of the high D personality type. You know they don’t want to take too much time out of their busy day to speak with you. They want things to happen quickly, and they are fast decision-makers. You need to be brief, to the point, and as efficient as possible.

On the contrary, if you have a high I, things are different. On the grid, we have an assertive person who is emotional. With a high I, you want to take some time to ask about their personal interests. You want to ask what they did last weekend, and about their family. Get social, because they relate to that. When you have future appointments with them, be sure to schedule extra time to accommodate their need to chitchat for an extra ten minutes. These touches aren’t to manipulate a person, but to honor them by communicating in their preferred fashion, even if they aren’t aware of what that is.

Let’s say you’ve determined that this person is a high S. Now we are looking at the bottom-right corner of the grid, which represents reserved and emotional. You need to win the trust of a high S. They are loyal team players. If you can make them feel a part of the team, they will champion your cause to the degree that they will be an additional sales rep out in the field.

Don’t be too aggressive when you speak with a high S, because they need to absorb information at their own pace. You must provide them with solutions that speak to their needs of security and stability. They are very family-oriented.

The final personality type you might run into is the high C. Quite frankly. C’s can be the most difficult people to work with. (Except my wife, who is perfect in every way.) They are very logical and very reserved. They are going to be low-key, and have a long thought process. A high C doesn’t want to listen to a fast-talking person. Deliver information at a slow pace, and deliver facts only. They don’t operate on emotion. These people do very well with spreadsheets.

When receiving a referral from someone familiar with DISC, I might hear: “This person is a high C.” I immediately know that this person will need time to determine whether to work with me, and that they will want to see the numbers in detail. They will also ask lots of specific and detailed questions that I’ll need to be prepared to answer.

In conclusion, working with members of your extended team in utilizing this process is very helpful. The best part about this is that the client wins. They are being treated in the way that works best for them.

Publisher’s Directions: This article may be freely distributed so long as the copyright, author’s information, disclaimer, and an active link (where possible) are included. Disclaimer: Statements and opinions expressed in the articles, reviews and other materials herein are those of the authors. While every care has been taken in the compilation of this information and every attempt made to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Steve Hoogenakker will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within these pages or any information accessed through this site. Steve loves his wife Teri Hoogenakker and their kids, Paul Hoogenakker, Kirsten Hoogenakker and Gerrit Hoogenakker very much.

This article written by Steve Hoogenakker of Taylor Made Landscape. Steve has 20 years in leadership and management. He can be reached at Steve@Landscape.Pro.

Copyright © 2006 the national learning institute

Copyright © 2006 The National Learning Institute

When was the last time you felt excited, motivated and extremely keen to be at work? Chances are it was when you had a job or project that really interested you, you had control over what you did and the way you did it, and you didn’t have any worries about “over zealous boss” interference or lack of job security. It’s a great feeling and we can all probably relate stories of how and when we were most “motivated” at work.

But as managers, do we consciously try to provide this same level of motivation for all of our employees? Or, are we merely fixated on striving to achieve the deadlines, budgets and targets that are set for us (and that seem to be getting tougher and tougher and placing more and more stress on us and our people), and forgetting what it was really like when we worked in an environment that was truly “motivational”.

My challenge to practising managers, is to think back to when they were most motivated at work and identify the reasons why (list them on a sheet of paper as dot points). Then, set about implementing these same conditions for their own people. (Draw up your own list now and see how it compares with mine)

I’ve issued this challenge to managers over the last 20 years in management development forums and invariably their “motivational conditions” they identify are:

– Autonomy the chance to take control over a complete project or unit of work in which I am really interested
– Responsibility for setting goals and targets and being accountable for achieving them
– Recognition for achieving meaningful results
– Development of my skills, knowledge and capabilities to their full potential

I then ask them to identify the things that really irritate and annoy them and (often) change what could have been a motivating workplace into a drudgery. They are:

– Bosses who do not recognise them for their efforts, or worse still, take the credit themselves
– A lack of feeling of “team”, ie., “we are in this together”
– Constant implied or implicit threats of demotion or dismissal
– Insufficient salary (by comparison to others in the firm or in the industry)

If these sound familiar, then you’re right! Frederick Herzberg in his classic HBR article “Once More, How do you Motivate Employees?” (harvardbusinessonline.hbsp.harvard.edu) came up with two similar sets of lists nearly forty years ago that he labelled “Motivators” and “Satisfiers”.

Do they hold true today? Recent research into the turnover rates for young employees (20 30 yrs) shows that in some industries, the turnover rate of young employees is as high as 25% annually due to lack of perceived career development and training, and limited opportunities for involvement in other areas of the firm and their profession. These younger people, by comparison to their predecessors:
– Are more opportunistic in taking new jobs.
– Are more mobile.
– Have greater expectations.
– Are easily bored.
Andrew Heathcote (www.brw.com.au/stories) in answer to this challenge suggests that managers need to:
Communicate:
– Be honest during interviews.
– Be serious about performance reviews.
– Do more career mapping.
– Create a forum to develop a greater spirit of involvement.
Tailor the workplace:
– Provide more job rotation.
– Arrange more rotation between offices.
– Develop specific training.
– Introduce variety.
– Develop forums for social interaction.
Be flexible:
– Consider providing sabbaticals (so they can travel without resigning).
– Increase the availability of unpaid leave.

So today’s younger employee is not so different from the generation who manage them maybe they want their motivation and satisfaction a little faster!

By the way, notice that the majority of items on Andrew’s list are what Herzberg called “Motivators”. In fact the only two that could be termed real “Satisfiers” are the last two sabbaticals and unpaid leave.

But, to return to my initial question, does motivation equate with happiness? Richard Layard (www.pfd.co.uk/clients/layardr/b-aut.html) suggests that work plays a very important part in our happiness and that a lot of our happiness actually comes from the work we do. And the job that we do is affected by how we are allowed to do it. In addition, he found that in regard to the “Satisfiers”:
– Not having a job when you should have one, is much worse than suffering a sudden drop in income
– People who feel insecure about retaining their job, suffer a loss of happiness (relative to those who do feel secure) that is 50% greater than the loss of happiness suffered by people whose income drops by a third.

Andrew Oswald of the University of Warwick (www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/ staff/faculty/oswald/homejobs.pdf) confirms some of the importance of the “satisfiers”:

– Having a lot of job security is important to feeling a high degree of satisfaction with your job
– People with relatively high incomes or university degrees tend to get more satisfaction
– Women tend to be more satisfied than men
– The self-employed tend to be more satisfied
– People who work in a small workplace tend to be more satisfied than those who work for large employers
– Working at home tends to lead to higher satisfaction
– A job that involves dealing with people tends to bring higher satisfaction

Herzberg would be very pleased with the results of the amazing amount of today’s research that confirms his contention that it is important for managers to concentrate on both the “Motivators” and the “Satisfiers” if one is to have happy and motivated employees.

The message? Managers, revisit your own list of “Motivators” Start working on implementing the things on that list of your’s with your employees today!

If you would like to find out how motivated and satisfied your people are, you can do so with a simple feedback profile such as CHECKpoint (www.nationallearning.com.au/index_files/EmployeeFeedbackandMotivation.htm). CHECKpoint has been developed on the work of Herzberg and another great social psychologist, D.C. McLelland. It not only provides feedback on employee motivation and satisfaction, but also how to maintain these and address any problematic issues.

There was an interesting article in pr week last week, on the subject of leadership communication

There was an interesting article in PR Week last week, on the subject of leadership communication. Entitled ‘Get the best out of your boss’ it outlines six of the most common leadership styles and suggests how communicators can best play to the personalities of their leaders. It’s a nice reminder of the breadth of styles we have to work with and provides some useful pointers on how to play to your boss’s particular strengths.

The six leadership styles – and the supporting descriptions (I’ve paraphrased) are:

  1. Visionary leader – the classic rock star CEO who sets the big-picture and excels at moving people towards a shared vision. These leaders are superb public speakers and enjoy life in the spotlight. Barack Obama is a good example.
  2. Affiliative leader – this type of leader wants to be your friend. A collaborative figure, the affiliative leader focuses on emotional needs and is most likely to ask ‘how are you?’. Angela Merkel is held up as an example.
  3. Coaching leader – holds long conversations that often extend beyond the work place. Good at helping employees identify their strengths and weaknesses and linking these to career goals. Step forward Dr Who.
  4. Democratic leader –these are the great listening leaders, though this is sometimes at the expense of decisive action. Favorite catchphrases include ‘what do you think?’. They like to show the way without pushing people in a particular direction. Lord Sebastian Coe is a good example.
  5. Pacesetter leader – most likely to say ‘copy me’, these hard working leaders never shirk a challenge and lead by example. One downside is that they often expect employees to automatically get the picture. Step forward Margaret Thatcher…
  6. Commanding leader – an old-school taskmaster who brings the dynamics of the playground into the boardroom. Very command and control in style they stick to one clear direction and refuse to consider an alternative routes or messages. Montgomery Burns is a good example.

The communicators quoted in the article, among them David Ferrabee and James Harkness, provide lots of useful advice on working with these types, including:

  • Providing visionary leaders the right platform and sufficient time to explain their vision to others and gather feedback. High profile tactics like webcasts and regular publication profiles go down well with these types, but they may sometimes lack an eye for detail and require specific IC support in this area.
  • Identifying opportunities for affiliative leaders to show their steel. Tactics like back to the floor are useful here, as are structured team meetings which focus on sharing constructive feedback. One classic issue with these types is their desire to communicate only the positive messages.
  • Playing to the strengths of coaching leaders by encouraging them to host small, intimate sessions and focus on helping people turn strategy into action. These types are not great at big picture, but excel at one-to-one.
  • Creating high-involvement forums for democratic leaders – workshops, online forums and blogs are particularly powerful. Clear, decisions communications help overcome this leader’s tendency towards indecision. Arm them with insights and intelligence about the workforce and they should respond well.
  • Encouraging the pacesetting leader to be more inclusive, more considerate of the feelings of others and creating plenty of listening opportunities. Inclusivity is key here and tactics like recognition programmes and use of social media channels can be useful.
  • Context is critical for the commanding leader. Rather than just explaining what to people, they need to focus on building understanding around the why. Big picture strategy is important here – and tactics like learning maps and visuals and strategy toolkits can be very handy.  Listening channels are important too – and employees may require anonymity as commanding leaders can breed distrust and fear. Coaching in body language is also useful.

Now a lot of shopping centers has become a unique emerald landscape, a variety of styles, a variety of colors, various shapes, all kinds of dazzling decorations

Now a lot of shopping centers has become a unique emerald landscape, a variety of styles, a variety of colors, various shapes, all kinds of dazzling decorations. Each brand have launched multiple series and multiple models of products, but the difference is not too many products, or even similar products of assimilation trends are becoming evident: First, raw materials, convergence, similar-priced products in the selection of raw materials, basically the same; Second, the convergence of technology, most brands do not have their own factory, traditional methods of processing customer orders; 3 is designed to convergence, in general have adopted the way of imitation and plagiarism. Jade industry has more than half of the brand product design convergence, few brands can be especially prominent people left a deep impression, can provide a sense of the brand’s unique personality.

Why are some jade can sell for several million, while others can only sell a few dollars? Tracing the source, not just materials, manufacturing technology differences, also reflected in the gap between the brand, this is the era of winning a brand! The implementation of brand operations, take the road of brand development is the emerald business inevitable choice. Among the many brands but also very difficult to achieve a breakthrough, especially in the motley profusion of pirated Promise of the market environment. China Jade industry has been facing the brand to survive, then the jade how “walking” the market?

After a lot of market research, Lam Chui Xuan Fei carried out careful research and concluded. At present, the jade market development constraints reasons: First, intense competition in the market, and mutual strife, price competition; second is the design development level is not high, compared with the mature brand of diamonds and gold far behind; 3 is the brand influence is small, well-known is not high.

Creating famous brand, brand personality to resolve the issue and improve the brand value is the current Jade brand “to go” market fundamental way. Lam Chui Xuan Jade attaches great importance to innovative design, Lam Chui Xuan Jade All products are from Myitkyina in northern Myanmar, mining, product design and development of continuous innovation, and integrate into the Western classic design concepts, will the East and West, ancient jade culture of advanced the perfect integration of design concept, creating a unique fashion Xuan Lam Chui-design style, well received by consumers and fashion urban youth’s affection. Homogenization for the emerald industry, the phenomenon of the brand, industry status and development trend, as well as the pursuit of individual consumers, Lynn Xuan Fei Tsui most innovative development of brand personality jade products, Zhang Yang personality, a unique taste, to show themselves and reject similar, to create high-quality fine emerald advantage of the brand.

Currently Lynn Xuan Fei Tsui development ideas is to use personalized brand means, vigorously promote the brand, and comprehensively promote the work of investment process. Let franchisee understand the brand, choosing the right brand to join, but also shows the Lynn Chui Xuan great confidence in their own right. The face of increasingly fierce market competition, Lam Chui Xuan growing brand awareness and striving for famous brand, on the one hand and vigorously promote brand and advertising efforts to increase investment on the other hand, a national investment, the image to open stores in major cities, and strive to increase the pace of implementation of brand building to further improve the overall image.

Jade market from the current point of view, take the road of brand development is still very necessary. Only bigger and stronger the brand will only be in the same product, obtain an absolute advantage, to upgrade their social status. Brand winning, and only the brand in order to enable consumers to be convinced, recognition and confidence to buy. The final competition will be jade industry, adhering to the brand and channel competition. Companies within the industry should have a clear brand positioning, competitive strategy and long-term promotion and operation of the mechanism, if an enterprise lack of brand awareness and long-term strategic planning, will eventually lose their channels and consumers, the eventual loss of the market.

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